22 Start: Look at Persuasive Speech Assignment Sheet

Persuasive Speech Assignment

“Good Citizen Persuasive Speech”

START:  Understand the Purpose of the Assignment

  • Think about the topics that you already are involved in. Creative Commons photo from pexel.com.

    To persuade your audience, as potentially active citizens in a nation predicated upon an active, participatory citizenry, to voluntarily become involved in producing a positive difference in our community.

  • To allow students an opportunity to understand, discover the importance of, and intentionally engage in, an individual action that promotes a public/community good. In effect, students see first-hand how their engagement affects the lives of others; individuals can make a difference.
  • To promote Civic Engagement! American philosopher and educator, John Dewey, posited that “Democracy has to be born anew every generation and education is its midwife” (School and Society, 2nd edition, 1933). Dewey points out that, on a fundamental level, education, engagement, and democracy are inextricably bound with one another. This assignment reflects Dewey’s observation.

Understand the MN State Communication Pathways Learning Outcomes for this Assignment:

Students should be able to:

1.1 Demonstrate appropriate topic selection, audience analysis, organization, and content development in a speaker-audience setting.

1.2b Create and perform persuasive messages.

1.3 Practice effective verbal and nonverbal delivery techniques that are well suited to the occasion and audience.

1.4 Utilize appropriate research strategies to discover and ethically integrate supporting materials from diverse sources and points of view.

1.5 Demonstrate the ability to listen, analyze, and provide feedback on public discourse.

READ – Read the Correlated Chapters and the Assignment Sheet 

Procedure Steps to Completing this Speech Assignment Sheet

~STEP 1:   Decide Upon a Topic that you are/can become Involved in, Interview and Research!

1)  Choose a topic that focuses on a local concern, community action, and civic/social group or issue which you support and persuade us to do what you do.  Alternatively, you may choose to persuade why we should NOT do something.

You will hand in a summary of how YOU are involved in the topic of volunteer work, participating in an event, past work experience, etc. You will attach this to your typed speech outline on the day of your speech and in the drop box.

Reflecting the democratic spirit, your idea of what we can do to make a difference should include actions open to others for involvement – if even in a small way (e.g., sign this petition or join or buy this, go there, etc.).  You will need to persuade us to do this too, so make sure the possibility of persuasion exists.  (See me if you have questions). You should talk about your experience in your speech.

KEEP IT SIMPLE:

  • You can keep it simple: Think of topics on campus – the learning center, the library, sports, supporting the arts, attending office hours, etc.
  • You can get creative: why we should attend local events, polar plunges, eating for charity, going to the local arts, attending a nonprofit organization’s fundraiser, taking a class in community education, etc.
  • Go political – there are local political races, organizations, etc.
  • Just show up at an event planned by a great group – if you go, then you have earned the right to share why should go.

OR, TRY AN ACTIVITY:

  • Your choice can be an organized type of activity, such as:
    • becoming involved in school government or a club, trying out local politics, support/oppose legislative issues (hot topics this year are marriage, guns, and immigration as well as funding for education – even your own!), volunteering at the local shelters, helping at a church, mosque, synagogue or temple, visiting the elderly, mentoring children, cleaning the YMCA, teaching children tasks at a daycare center, school, giving blood or helping with a blood drive, visiting Paws and Claws animals, etc.
  • It could also be much less structured and informal, such as:
    • organizing a food drive at work, going into your neighborhood to do an action, donating blood, or some other creative act.  If you do this less structured activity, you still need to find a “volunteer supervisor” to verify you did indeed do so AND add photos to show the progress. Contact your instructor before you “do your own thing.” Conservation, organic gardening, going to the Farmer’s Market, etc.
  • Thoughts…. If you never see your spouse, friends, or family…have them join you!
    • If you are a busy parent, why not involve your children?  You may do something such as organizing the local children to “clean up the neighborhood,” having a food drive among your children’s friends for the local food-shelf, selling lemonade to benefit some group, gathering gently used toys and clothes to donate to the local shelter, etc.
    • Too busy? I CAN HELP YOU FIND SOMETHING TO ATTEND, VISIT, JOIN, VOLUNTEER ON CAMPUS OR EVEN VIA YOUR COMPUTER! BUT YOU NEED TO ASK ME IF YOU NEED HELP!

2)   Localize your topic by interviewing a “local expert.”

You must prove that this topic area is a concern for our community.  You need to show personalized connections to your audience. To do this, you will need to contact a “local” “expert” on your topic and interview him or her (if you reach a dead-end here– sometimes, despite all your efforts, folks don’t answer back – contact me asap).  Include information you gain from this contact person in your speech.  Additionally, make a clear statement of how this topic has an impact on OUR daily lives. Summarize what you learned from your interview in a paragraph and hand it in with your outline on the day of your speech and in the drop box as noted in class.

3) Research: You will need four sources in addition to your interview. Thus, you will have at least 5 sources total with your interview. You can conduct additional interviews, use local news providers, more generalized research on volunteerism or your topic, etc. You will complete a “research defense” assignment again.  Make certain to cite your interview also. 

~STEP 2 – Survey the Class

Create an audience survey following the same procedure for your informative speech. Ask three questions to gain more information about how we feel about your topic: one fixed response, one ranked, one open – follow these question types for credit (you may ask more questions though). Once again, complete and attach your survey report to your outline – make sure to look over the particular questions – answer fully.  This time your focus will be to explain how you used the data to persuade us.

  • You will survey the class on your topic prior to writing your speech. This will help you give a more effective, better-adapted speech. You will ask us to respond to at least three different questions about your speech topic (one fixed-response, one ranked question, and one open question — see survey sample in class). Anyone in the class can refuse to take your survey.
  • You will report your survey’s results as outlined below and attach this report to your formal outline due on the day of your speech delivery and of course posted in the D2L Speech 3 drop box.
    • A. What were the questions?
    • B.  What was the mean (average) response of your fixed response and ranked question?   In general, what did you learn from the open question?
    • C. What did you infer about your audience from this data?  BE DETAILED. What did you guess about us?  What did you think we would think, feel, do, etc. about your topic? What about our demographics – what do you infer about us based upon who we are concerning how we’d listen to your speech, etc.
    • D.  How did you use your data and inferences to adapt to your audience?   Who did you see as your “target audience” – why?  How did you select your sources based upon the audience? Address this thoughtfully in a paragraph. Be specific in your response.

 

PRACTICE – Time yourself as you write/practice the speech


~STEP 3 – Write & Practice the Speech, Meet with your Instructor

Now you are ready to write your speech using the motivated sequence organizational pattern. You must use this organizational pattern and ONLY this pattern (see worksheets and your book).

  • Organize your speech in as a 7-9 minute persuasive speech.  You will be signaled to stop at 10 minutes, 30 seconds due to time — any materials presented after 9 minutes, 30 seconds will not be considered part of the speech and will not be considered as part of the graded materials. Late penalty after 9 minutes and 15 seconds.
  • In your speech, you will attempt to persuade us to also become involved in your organization or issue.  You will need to be very specific with what you want us to do (dates, locations, times, etc.).
  • You must not persuade us to do something that you have not done or will not do.
  • We will use the motivated sequence in this speech and ONLY this organizational design:  (attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action — see the text, D2L materials in the Content Area and the handout). See the links on our website and the text for more information on this pattern.  Ask me if you have any questions about this format. Examine the sample outlines posted online.
  • Rough Drafts should be shown to your instructor as scheduled and handed in on D2L as noted in the schedule. We will have “check-ins” to discuss your rough drafts. Please submit drafts….that are GOOD, detailed, well-developed….please. Include your audience analysis report and works cited. You will only gain feedback via your conference as this is most effective — please keep your appointment.
  • Day of your Speech – Hand in a typed, full-sentence, fully documented (yes, parenthetical references in the outline!) outline and bibliography and submit this to the D2L Dropbox.
  • You must use a visual aid. You can use PowerPoint or a Prezi J if you have not done so yet.

 

DO

~STEP 4 – Deliver Speech

 

REFLECT

~STEP 5 – Self Assessment – See D2L

To summarize, this is what you need to hand in:

  • Optional before your speech:  Attached Outline Worksheet for this speech
  • Due on the day of your speech:
    • A typed full-sentence outline, complete with source citations.
    • Your works cited page/bibliography that includes sources, all credible and cited in the proper APA or MLA format (if you forgot how to do this, see www.stylewizard.com)
    • Your Audience Survey Report
    • A brief paragraph describing what you did to make a difference between the name and telephone number of a contact person, who may then verify.
    • A brief summary of each interview and what you learned.
    • Don’t forget we’ll video – please clear your memory from your camera/phone/iPad to video. Your instructor can use the IPad for video too.
    • Remember your visual aid. Use a backup for PowerPoint/electronic aids. Make sure the sound is up, your page will open, etc. if you use the internet or a video.

Great Ideas to get started!

  • Volunteer at a local nonprofit organization.  Help with office work, mailings, serving their clients, etc.!
  •  Write a letter to the editor, to a group that would make a difference, to your school board, our school, etc.!
  • Phone your concerns to an agency, group or government body.
  • Help with fundraising, or raise money yourself for a good cause…MDA is always organizing something for the annual fall telethon!
  • Form your own group in your neighborhood, school, and/or workplace towards some community-minded project or task.  Gather garbage with your children’s friends in your neighborhood.
  • Do some footwork of your own!  Join a race for preventing breast cancer, MS, diabetes, or another worthy cause.
  • Help out the campus in some way!
  • Organize a food drive in our class or on campus…go see your Student Association Senators for help here! OR help them in some way!
  • Engage yourself in conversation about this topic to others in a public forum, discussion or even one-on-one.
  • Do extensive research on the topic and provide a local group with this information (e.g., your church, neighborhood association, workmates, etc.)

 

 

PERSUASIVE SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET
(MOTIVATED SEQUENCE)

Remember: this is just a suggested outline format, you may personalize your speech, but MUST follow the Motivated Sequence organization for this speech. Please upload a typed copy of this worksheet to D2L as noted in the schedule and class announcements.

Hand this in as directed in the schedule. THEN – after revisions, you will hand in a typed full-sentence (complete with your parenthetical quoted sources in the text) version of this worksheet along with your Works Cited page and your audience analysis on the day of your speech presentation as well as within the drop box online.  Bring a print copy to class as noted in the schedule.

This design works best for action speeches; it is very effective for many purposes though!!!  It follows a pattern similar to the problem-solution pattern but ends with more emphasis upon how action can be taken to actually help the solution come

Television commercials, infomercials, telemarketers and the basic sales pitch often follow this pattern. The five steps include attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action.  See your text for more information.  This outline worksheet will help you to write a strong speech.  However, it is just one format, you certainly can adapt it to your own approach. For example, you might use two quotes and three statistics vs. the suggested sub-sub point items below. You must follow the basic outline features though (the elements of introductions and conclusions, basic order of the pattern, transitions, etc.).

Remember: this is just a suggested outline format, you may personalize your speech, transitions, number of subpoints and sub-subpoints. Please upload a typed copy of this worksheet to D2L as noted in the schedule and class announcements.

 

Topic: __________________________________________________________

Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about ______________________.

ADD AUDIENCE ANALYSIS REPORT:

  1. What did you learn about our class in response to your questions? List the questions.
  2. Report the data. What was the “average” or “mean” response to the “fixed response” and the “ranked question?” You can find this out by simple division. If you need help, let me know. Summarize how the class responded to your open question.

 

  • What did you infer about your audience from this data?  BE DETAILED…what did you guess about us? What did you think we would think, feel, do, etc. about your topic? What about our demographics – what do you infer about us based upon who we are concerning how we’d listen to your speech, etc.

 

  • How did you use your data and inferences to adapt to your audience?   Who did you see as your “target audience” – why? How did you select your sources based upon the audience? Address this thoughtfully in a paragraph. Be specific in your response.

 

Add your Interview Summary:

 

  • Who did you interview? What is their Expertise?
  • Contact Information for Interviewer:
  • Summary of Interview:

 

How are you involved in your topic – what did you do that you are asking us to do?

  • In a paragraph, summarize what you have done.
  • Who can verify this? Add their contact information. You can add photographs proving you did this instead.

 

Outline

INTRODUCTION

 

The introduction serves to spark attention and draw us into your speech. To facilitate this, write responses to the questions below in a short paragraph. Remember, for this speech, you will need to address the “NEED” in the attention device)

Attention Material (This speech requires a strong opening immediately pointing to the need (why they should act and follow through with your “call to action”). You can try a simple compelling story that draws in pathos, ask for participation ( refer to the occasion, refer to recent or historical events, refer to previous speeches, refer to personal interest, use a clever quote, use a startling statistic,  use an analogy, cite a definition, use a music/video clip, use of suspense, ask a question, etc.):

Gain Goodwill of the Audience (tell us how this relates to us; for this type of speech a statement that shares why they should care/how they are locally involved is essential).

Credibility Material (Generally, in this area, you’ll establish external credibility by stating why you care, why you can be trusted, or how you know your materials, etc. Sources are especially important to establish your credibility.):

Thesis & Topic Preview: This thesis/preview should follow need, satisfaction (solution) and visualization (benefits of action and consequences of inaction).  For example: There is a need to address ____ – but a solution of _____________has benefits I will share.

(Transition into Body of Speech, e.g.,  so what is at risk, what is the problem we are facing……)

 

 

Body

I. Main Point #1 — “Need,” or what is the “problem” — why do we need to do something?

A. What is the Need for Action?

  1. Logos – explain and succinctly describe the problem with facts, local statistics, etc.
  2. Mythos – as a community how have we seen this to be true – what are the signs that a problem exists? What shared symptoms are there? Any effects on us?
  3. Pathos: Example/ Narrative
  4. Ethos: Testimony – how have you seen this problem, expert testimony from an interview and/or research

 

B. Demonstrate the extent of this problem — how is it urgent, recent, relevant, current, etc.

  1.  Logos – add facts to show the extent of the problem.
  2.  Mythos – who is impacted?
  3.  Pathos: Example/Narrative
  4. Ethos: what have you seen/testimony from your interview/research.

 

C. Demonstrate the scope of the problem — who, where, when is the problem seen?

  1. Logos – Facts/Statistics
  2. Pathos – Example/Narrative
  3. Ethos – why you care one last time
  4. Mythos – narrow to the local audience so they are ready for the solution you will present.

 

(Summary: ___________________________________________________________)

(Preview :_____________________________________________________________)

 

II. Main Point #2 – “Satisfaction” or how your solution will solve the problem you presented.

A. Solution Simply Stated.

  1. Logos – Describe the solution with basic facts addressing the problem.
  2. Ethos – Give testimony that this solution has worked/will work.
  3. Mythos/Pathos – why this solution relates to the localized issue you are speaking about.

 

B. The Practicality of Solution.

  1. Logos: Demonstrate how the solution to this problem is reasonable and relevant to its solution.
  2. Logos: What is your strategy for putting these plans into place? Have you any evidence that it may reasonably work?

 

  1. Transforming Plan into Action
  2. What are the sequential parts of this plan?
  3. How do we begin?
    • Whom do we call/visit/to begin?
    • How do we continue the steps?

C. What factors will allow for the effectiveness of these steps?

  1. Ethos: Testimony
  2. Logos: Facts it will work
  3. Pathos/Mythos: Narrative about how it is a good solution

 

(Summary: ___________________________________________________________)

(Preview :_____________________________________________________________)

 

III. Main Point #3 – “Visualization of the Results” – Remember you can rework this section to meet your own topic needs, but here is a suggestion – use visual aids as well here!

 

A. Prove there are Consequences of Inaction

  1. Describe the situation if we do nothing with an explanation
  2. Add a fact (you can discuss information from your “need” too)
  3. Give testimony to back up your claim
  4. Remind us how WE are connected to “no action”

 

B. Prove there are Expected Results of Action

  1. Describe the situation if we do get involved with an explanation
  2. Add a fact (you can discuss information from your “need” too
  3. Give testimony to back up your claim
  4. Remind us how WE are connected to  the results of this “action”

 

 

CONCLUSION

(Write a short paragraph of what you will say; include all of the following functions of conclusions):

Signal an End (Signaling to indicate the end often uses cue terms such as “in conclusion,” but of course now you need to be creative and capture the spirit of this persuasive appeal, e.g. “Today we’ve….” or “So many lessons can be learned by thinking about who or what we admire as well as why….”):

Summary (please review in the order covered, as the summation should match your thesis):

Goodwill Audience Tie (tell us again how we, individually and/or as part of the civic community benefit from knowing this, show the connection between you and the audience):  

Concluding Clincher/Call to Action (never, ever end on something abrupt, e.g. “that’s it” — plan out the end, better yet, tie back in some fashion to the attention device used in the introduction):

 

Works Cited

(MUST use correct APA or MLA form for ANY credit)

If you do not know how to do this, see:

 

Grading Rubric

Good Citizen Persuasive Speech Grading Rubric Explained

Competency Excellent (4) Good (3) Fair (2) Unsatisfactory (1)
Competency 1:
Narrows Topic and Thesis Appropriately for Audience and Occasion
Excellent

Topic focus and speech thesis are exceptionally appropriate for:

·        General Purpose (e.g., persuasive speeches employed persuasive strategies and were not merely informative in nature; informative speeches were informative and not persuasive.).

·        Time Constraints (speech was within the time limit).

·         Audience
(speech clearly indicates that the speaker has adapted  to the audience) —

·        Occasion – topic fits the Good Citizen Speech

·        Integrated information about your volunteer work into your speech well.

Satisfactory

Topic and focus are most appropriate for the purpose, time constraints, and audience.

 

Overall:

·        General Purpose was clear to distinguish but not as effective had the speaker employed additional rhetorical strategies.

·        Speaker was slightly rushed or slightly under the time limit.

·         Audience analysis was obvious but the approach to the speech did not fully capitalize on the analysis. Target Audience is not as clear as it could be.

·        Had some integration of your volunteer work but could have more.

 

Fair

Topic and focus are appropriate for only 2 of the following:  purpose, time constraints, and audience.

 

Overall:

·        General Purpose was less clear to distinguish but not as effective had the speaker employed additional rhetorical strategies.

·        Speaker was rushed or under the time limit.

·        Very few references to the audience were made. No identifiable Target Audience.

·        It was not as clear what you did to volunteer.

 

Unsatisfactory

Topic and focus are not appropriate for either purpose, time constraints or audience.

 

Competency 2:

Supporting Material is Appropriate based on Audience and  Occasion

 

Excellent

Supporting material is exceptional in quality, variety, and relevance from diverse sources and points of view.

·         Support was used (e.g., narrative, statistics, testimony, and examples) and relevant for each main point.

·         Sources of support were identified and were credible (e.g., lacked bias, recent, etc.).

·         Demonstrated critical thinking and avoided logical fallacies with use of evidence.  Used evidence to enhance ethos, pathos, logos, and mythos.

 

Satisfactory

Supporting material is appropriate in quality and variety but could have been from more diverse sources and points of view.

·         Support was used for most, but not all main points (e.g., narrative, statistics, testimony, and examples) and was mostly relevant to the main point.

·         Most often sources were identified and were mostly credible.

·         Demonstrated an above-average level of critical thinking and mostly avoided logical fallacies with use of evidence.

Fair

Some supporting material was used, but mostly the speaker did not identify the source of the support or depended upon personal experience only.  More use of diverse sources and points of view should have been used.

·         Support was used in some cases but generally needed more relevance and diversity in type (support was not diversified between statistics, testimony and examples).

·         Few sources were identified and the credibility of the sources was unclear.

·         Some logical fallacies were present.

 

 

Unsatisfactory

Supporting material is inappropriate in quality and variety.

Competency 3:

Organizational Pattern is Appropriate to Topic, Audience, Occasion and Purpose

 

 

Note – on the grading portion of the short rubric how points are distributed – more points are allotted for the correct organizational pattern and more are taken off if Motivated Sequence is NOT used.

Excellent

Exceptional introduction and conclusion; the body was exceptionally clear and included a logical progression within and between ideas.

Introduction Included:

·         Effective Attention device tied to “NEED”

·         Tie to the audience

·         Credibility statement

·         Thesis

·         Overall preparation for the body of the speech

Body included:

·        Discrete and distinguishable main points

·         Main points organized in a discernable pattern – using Motivated Sequence appropriate for the speech purpose

·         Logical and coherent arguments complete with supporting materials – lacking fallacies of reasoning

·         Transitions were used that reviewed the previous idea and previewed the next point

 

Conclusion:

·         Indicated End

·         Reviewed Main Points – call to Action!

·         Tied back to the audience

·         Included a Memorable End

Satisfactory

Appropriate introduction and conclusion; reasonably clear and logical progression within and between ideas.

 

 

Introduction Contained at Least:

·         Attention device

·         Goodwill relevance & Credibility

·         Thesis

 

Body Contained at Least:

·         2-5 main points that are distinguishable

·         Close to Motivated Sequence

·         Transitions that indicate movement but might not both preview and review adjoining ideas

·         Some use of support in logical argumentation

 

Conclusion Contained at Least:

·         Indication of an end

·         Reviewed points but perhaps not in the order articulated in the speech

·         Clear end but perhaps not quite memorable

 

Fair

Some indication that an introduction and conclusion were used but did not include a full development of these areas; less clear progression within and between ideas.


Introduction Contained at Least:

·         Indication of a planned beginning

·         A sense of goodwill

 

Body Contained at Least:

·         2-5 main points

·         Some distinction between the main points but not Motivated Sequence

·         Some indication that the idea was shifting from point to point

·         Some sense of logic in the construction of the order and arguments

 

Conclusion Contained at Least:

·         Indication of the end and a restatement of the goals of the speech

·         A final statement was made to indicate the speech was complete

Unsatisfactory

Hard to distinguish a beginning, middle or end. No development of an introduction or conclusion; no clear, logical progression within and between ideas.

 

Competency 4:
Language is Appropriate to Topic, Audience, Occasion, and Purpose
Excellent

Language is exceptionally clear, vivid, and appropriate.

·         Identified with the audience:
lacked bias, offensive language choices, over-used jargon and inappropriately technical language

·      Fits audience analysis goals.

 

Satisfactory

Language is reasonably clear, vivid, and appropriate.

·         Mostly Identified with the audience and included at least 3 of the listed areas:
lacked bias, offensive language choices, over-used jargon and inappropriately technical language

·   Somewhat fits audience analysis goals.

 

Fair

Language is mostly clear, sometimes vivid, and generally appropriate.

·         Mostly Identified with the audience and included at least 2 of the listed areas:
lacked bias, offensive language choices, over-used jargon and inappropriately technical language

·       Target audience not clear
due to lack of clarity with
audience analysis report

Unsatisfactory

Language is unclear or inappropriate.

Competency 5:

Effective Vocal Delivery for Audience, Occasion, and Purpose

 

Excellent

Exceptional use of vocal variety in a conversational mode including:

Variety in Rate, Pitch, and Intensity to Heighten and Maintain Interest.

Exceptional Articulation, Pronunciation, and Grammar.

Satisfactory

Acceptable use of vocal variety in a conversational mode.  Acceptable articulation.  Few pronunciation or grammatical errors. Some overuse of vocalized pauses.

Satisfactory

Some hint of vocal variety in a conversational mode but more monotone is evident.  Much evidence of articulation errors.  Many of pronunciation or grammatical errors. Vocalized pauses were excessive.

Unsatisfactory

Failure to use a vocal variety or a conversational mode.

Unacceptable articulation, pronunciation or grammar.

Competency 6:
Effective Visual Delivery for Audience, Occasion, and Purpose
Excellent

Exceptional posture, gestures, bodily movement, facial expressions, eye contact, and appearance. Physical Behaviors Support the Verbal Message.  Visual aids enhance the message.

Satisfactory

Acceptable visual aids, posture, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact, and appearance.

Fair

Some effort made to use visual aids, posture, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact and appearance in delivering the message, but improvement is needed.

Unsatisfactory

Unacceptable visual aid use, posture, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact or appearance.

 

 “GOOD CITIZEN” PERSUASIVE SPEECH GRADING RUBRIC (SHORT FORM)

                  Name: ___________________                                 

Competency 1:
Narrows Topic and Thesis Appropriately for Audience and Occasion
·  Points: 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

  • Speech was adapted according to the audience analysis and gave a need/solution that fits our local area for this specific audience.
  • Scope fit the time limits
  • Academic and Professional w/Persuasive Appeals Supported for a  College Level Speech
Comments:

ADDITIONAL TIME PENALTY – 5 for each 30 sec. over/under the time limit

 

Competency 2:

Supporting Material is Appropriate based on Audience and Occasion

 

·  Ethos 1 2 3 4  = ____/4

·  Pathos1 2 3 4 = ____/4

·  Logos 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

 

· Source Citation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  = ____/8

Source 1: who – where – when?
Source 2: who – where – when?

Source 3: who – where – when?

Source 4: who – where – when?

Interview: v= who – where – when?

 

·         Quality of Sources (academic or primary sources, not only .com or .org) = ____8

 

Comments:
Competency 3:

Organizational Pattern is Appropriate to Topic, Audience, Occasion and Purpose
·   Intro Structure [areas well organized and well delivered]

  • Attention Device (tied to need) 1 2 3 4 = ____/4
  • Tie to Audience 1 2 3 4 = ____/4
  • Credibility 1 2 3 4 = ____/4
  • Thesis / Preview 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

·   Connectives/ Transitions/Format 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

·   Need 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

·   Satisfaction 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

·   Visualization 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

·   Conclusion/ Structure [areas well organized and well delivered]

  • Brakelight 1 2 3 4 = ____/4
  • Tie Back 1 2 3 4 = ____/4
  • Summary 1 2 3 4 = ____/4
  • Memorable and CONFIDENT end 1 2 3 4 = ____/4

 

Comments:
Competency 4:
Language is Appropriate to Topic, Audience, Occasion and Purpose
·  Points: 1 2 3 4   = _____ 4
Comments:
Competency 5:

Effective Vocal Delivery for Audience, Occasion, and Purpose

·  Points: [1 2 3 4] * 2 =______/8

Interactive, vivid and conversational tone, few vocalized pauses, use of rate/pace, volume, articulation and diction. General professional yet adapted tone. Mood conveyed that matches topic.

Comments:
Competency 6:
Effective Visual Delivery for Audience, Occasion, and Purpose
(includes visual aids)·  Points: [1 2 3 4] * 2 = _____/8No reading, purposeful use of movement, eye contact, visual aid use
Comments:

* READING -5 additional points deducted.

 

Grade Breakdown                                          

Rubric Score = _______100 “rubric points” or _______ % c

License

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The Public Speaking Resource Project by Lori Halverson-Wente and Mark Halverson-Wente is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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