13 Reflect: Special Occasion Speech Self Critique

SAMPLE SPECIAL OCCASION SELF CRITIQUE ASSIGNMENT

(with Sydney’s Sample Answers Embedded)

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Start: After you give your speech, ASAP — watch your video one time without stopping it. Then, watch it a second time and answer these questions, rewinding, stopping and playing, etc. as you go. Answer the questions honestly. Remember to use specific examples to support your responses. Remember to quote your online textbook – OR notes online in the Content Area that are relevant to your response — often folks forget and that is the only reason they get poor scores (really!).

Read: look back at the chapters related to this unit.

Practice: review the vide of your speech

Do: Complete this

A nice job here will help bolster your grade…!!!

  1.  How did you practice for this speech (honestly)? What went well in your preparation and what will you do differently for your next speech? Answer fully below in two short paragraphs:
  • [Sample Reply from Sydney: I had slowly written my speech from the first day of class up until the weekend before I gave it, double and triple checking to make sure my dates, stories, and examples were 100% accurate. I read it out loud as I wrote it and reread it at several points while still writing it. I practiced it to my dog, my mom, my dad, and several of my closest friends. I tried to practiced natural movements, but I doubt any of my movements looked so calm while I presented.In one of the power points, a specific slide taught the 4 types of speech delivery, extemporaneous being the type we would use. I feel like I memorized most of my speech, not all of it, but there were parts that felt over practiced. In my next speech I may not practice as much with the hopes my speech doesn’t sound rehearsed.]

 

  1. Describe your emotional, physical and mental responses you experienced when presenting your speech. How did you feel after it?

 

  • [Sample Reply from Sydney: I was scared to give my speech. I was confident with my words, but I was worried they would upset others. I felt like I was the “white” girl up in front of everyone speaking about oppression. I am Native American, but more Irish; one look at me would scream “white”. That fact made me extremely nervous. I wanted to avoid eye contact, but knew I couldn’t which just made everything worse. I also became very stiff and awkward because I was sure at least one person must have been thinking, “What do you know about oppression?”After the speech I realized that yes, at the start people were probably thinking this has nothing to do with her, but by the end I had opened their minds to a whole new type of oppression. The one focused on Native Americans.]

 

  1. Watch your speech carefully. Now describe your greatest strength concerning the CONTENT of your speech (content is “what” you said, delivery is “how” you said it; be careful not to mix these up).

 

Also, for this question, include a specific example from your speech to illustrate your response (yes, quote yourself and describe the delivery of that quote); explain why this is a strength and include a quote and citation from the textbook to support your explanation.

  • [Sample Reply from Sydney: My greatest strength in content was my choice of words. a few examples include, “tremendous pain and suffrage”, and “forced me to forgive”. This is a strength because I made the audience feel the deep connotation that went with my words. The textbook states “Delivering a tribute and commemorative speech involves careful attention to language” (17-5). I was very careful when choosing my words so that the audience felt what I felt.]

 

  1. Now watch your speech carefully and describe your greatest strengths concerning the DELIVERY of your speech (delivery is “how” you said it, content is “what” you said).

Also, for this question, include a specific example from your speech to illustrate your response (yes, quote yourself and describe the delivery of that quote); explain why this is a strength and include a quote and citation from the textbook to support your explanation.

  • [Sample Reply from Sydney: My greatest strength while delivering was pausing. I tried to pauses after every bit of information that was hard to hear or process. For example, after I told the story about the burning of my great grandmas doll, I paused before stating, “this was all in an attempt to make her white.” I then paused again. The textbook states, “…you will encode and deliver a message which will then be decoded by audience members.” on page 1-10. My pauses were in places that I felt the audience needed a little extra time to decode my message.]
  1. What is your tentative topic for the Informative Speech? Why did you decide on this topic? Where will you look for research on this topic?
  • [Sample Reply from Sydney: I wish to inform my classmates on the importance of owning a pet and what it can do for your emotional, mental and physical health. I decided on this topic because, first, I love animals and I actually hope to get my vet tech degree and one day become a wildlife rehabilitator, and second, because my pets, even the fish, have done so much for me. I will most likely look online in the library’s Academic Search Premier (or other) database for experiments concerning the correlation between health and being a pet owner.]

 

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The Public Speaking Resource Project by Lori Halverson-Wente and Mark Halverson-Wente is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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